Gestalt Associates for Psychotherapy

ARE YOU CONSIDERING A NEW CAREER AS A PSYCHOTHERAPIST?
  • Gestalt Associates for Psychotherapy is pleased to announce the creation of its Psychoanalytic Program, beginning this October 2006 and open to applicants with an MA in any field. The program is chartered by the Education Department and will lead to licensure as a Psychoanalyst, one of the four new mental health professions in NYS. Using Gestalt theory as its theoretical foundation, the program is experience-rich and features lectures, demonstrations, live practicum, and a supervised clinical internship.

 

 

The following courses are required in the Gestalt Associates for Psychotherapy Psychoanalytic Program leading to NYS Licensure as a Psychoanalyst, in addition to the courses in the Clinical Fellowship Program. Clinical Experience (300 hours), Personal Analysis (300 hours) and Case Supervision (a minimum of 150 hours) take place over the course of the program’s 4 years. NYS requires that at least 50 hours of Case Supervision be devoted to single-case supervision.

Tuition: In addition to the underlying Clinical Fellowship Tuition and Fees there is a $450 charge for each 15-hour course, and a $300 charge for each 10-hour course.

PROGRAM OUTLINE

Year I: Fall Semester
Developmental Theory: Bowlby, Mahler and Stern
15 hours
History of Psychoanalytic Thought
15 hours
Diagnosis and the Body
15 hours

Year I: Spring Semester
Developmental Theory: Freud, Erikson & Piaget 15 hours
Dreaming, Dream Analysis, & Dreamwork
15 hours

Year II: Fall Semester
Transference, Countertransference, & Resistance: An Historical Overview 15 hours
Developing Intersubjectivity: The First Year of Life 15 hours
The Development of Gender Identity
15 hours

Year II: Spring Semester
Basic Psychoanalytical Concepts
10 hours
Research Statistics
15 hours
Resistance, Transference, Countertransference: Winnicott
10 hours

Year III: Fall Semester
Object Relations, Self Psychology and Gestalt Therapy: an Integration
10 hours
Case Seminar: Case Studies through the Life Cycle of Treatment
10 hours
Group Psychotherapy Practice
25 hours

Year III: Spring Semester
Ethical Considerations in Analytic Practice
15 hours
Sociocultural Issues and the Therapeutic Relationship
10 hours
Case Seminar in Dreamwork
10 hours

Year IV: Fall Semester
Understanding and Working With Personality Disorders
10 hours
Case Seminar: Presentness and Presence
10 hours
Psychoanalytic Research: The Case Study in Context
15 hours

Year IV: Spring Semester
Resistance, Transference, Countertransference: Existential Issues:
10 hours
Family and Couples Therapy From a Systems, Gestalt and Psychoanalytic Perspective
15 hours
Case Seminar: The Person-in-Relation 10 hours

 

EXTENDED COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

Year I: Fall Semester

Developmental Theory I: This seminar focuses on the developmental theories of Bowlby, Mahler and Stern, and their practical application to Gestalt Therapy. The course includes both lecture and demonstration/participation. Various techniques and strategies are explored for integrating developmental insights into the ongoing process of a Gestalt session. 15 hours
Instructor: Arleen Maiorano, LCSW, LP

History of Psychoanalytic Thought: This course delineates the last 100 years of psychoanalysis and its evolution into its many theoretical perspectives, with the goal of providing the student with a deeper historical and conceptual foundation for practice. We will trace this evolutionary tree from Sigmund Freud and Anna Freud, Heinz Hartmann and the beginning of ego psychology, object relations (Spitz, Mahler) through the Sullivanians, Melanie Klein, the British object relational school with Fairbairn and Winnicott, Erickson and Kohut and their contributions to Identity and the Self, through to contemporary Freudian theorists i.e. Kernberg, Lacan, Schafer, Loewald and finally to the relational school of psychoanalytic thought. We will also discuss how the “humanistic” schools of psychotherapy fit into this history i.e. Rogerian, Jungian, Gestalt, Bio-Energetics etc, which although distinguished by their theories and techniques, are still historically grounded in psychoanalytic theory. 15 hours
Instructor: Johanna Barrett, LCSW

Diagnosis and the Body: This course will focus on what our clients' bodies (muscular armoring, body structure, posture, breath and movement) reveal to us and how this helps orient us in developing a diagnosis. We will focus on the historical evolution of somatic consciousness in treatment. The course will consist of eight, two-hour modules. It will be both didactic and experiential. 15 hours
Instructor: Neila Wyman, LCSW, LP


Year I: Spring Semester

Developmental Theory: Basic Concepts: This course explores impairment of functioning and other symptoms in relationship to their genesis during the socialization process, from a physical, energetic perspective. We will work with memory recollection and in-the-moment re-experiencing of painful past episodes—where cognitive understanding is coupled with appropriate affect (abreaction). This working through process will be examined and discussed in detail, along with specific techniques for dealing with negative emotions and helping patients dispel the tension and confusion associated with repressed intra-psychic conflict. 15 hours Instructor: John Mastro, LCSW

Dreaming, Dream analysis, & Dreamwork: This course will review historical ways of thinking about and approaching dreams and theories of the psychology and physiology of the dreaming process. We will learn about Freudian, Jungian, and Gestalt approaches to dream analysis, interpretation and dreamwork, with a focus on exploring their similar goals of uncovering and understanding unconscious processes. We will especially attend to the differences between interpretive and experiential ways of working with dreams, utilizing case material and working with students' dreams during the practicum hours. 15 hours
Instructor: Susan Jurkowski, LCSW


Year II: Fall Semester

Transference, Countertransference, & Resistance I, An Historical Overview: In this course, we will explore how Freud's concept of 'transference' began to focus the work of analysis closer to the phenomenology of the present moment, and the gradual development of this concept into that of a 'transference/countertransference field.' We will compare Stolorow's idea of transference as 'organization of experience' to Goodman's emphasis on 'analyzing the internal structure of the actual experience' as the fundamental work of Gestalt therapy. We will consider Rank's idea of resistance as an expression of the patient's will, and explore its influence on the Gestalt view of resistance. 15 hours
Instructor: Susan Jurkowski, LCSW

Developing Intersubjectivity: The First Year of Life: This course discusses forms of intersubjectivity in contemporary infant research and its relationship to Gestalt therapy theory. Intersubjective process – an implicit knowing of the other that relies on identification and differentiation – is described from its roots in the infant/caregiver dyad. The co-created and emerging sequences of contacting and withdrawing are based on growing expectations of each partner of this dyad. It is here that nonverbal forms of intersubjective flow -- as primary organizers of the field -- support and integrate subsequent relational forms that emerge throughout life. 15 hours
Instructor: Ruella Frank, PhD, LMHC, LP

The Development of Gender Identity: In this course we will explore the multiple and intertwining cultural, biological, and psychological issues that contribute to the formation of a sense of a male or female gendered “self.” We will draw upon the works of such diverse theorists as Winnicott, Freud, Mitchell, Chodorow, Benjamin, and Gilligan, and analyze their contributions to an understanding of the role of gender in personality development. 15 hours Instructor: Arleen Maiorano, LCSW, LP


Year II: Spring Semester

Basic Psychoanalytical Concepts, Compared and Contrasted with Foundational Gestalt Therapy Theory: This course presents basic concepts in Psychoanalytic Theory-- consciousness and unconscious, defense mechanisms, structures of personality: id, ego, super-ego, transference and counter-transference -- and their similarities to and differences from foundational concepts in Gestalt Therapy Theory—self, creative adjusting, contact, and interruptions of contact, field. 10 hours
Instructor: Ruella Frank, PhD, LMHC, LP & Frances LaBarre, PhD

Introduction to Research Statistics: Students will master the basics of research and statistics, will be able to review and critique psychological, psychoanalytic and social research articles, including research design, analysis of samples, and understanding of qualitative and quantitative data. 15 hours
Instructor: Lina Jandorf, MA, LMHC

Resistance, Transference, Countertransference II, Winnicott: This course will draw from concepts of transference/countertransference/resistance as presented in previous seminars and will focus on Winnicott’s models of infant emotional development and of therapeutic interaction. Our deeper appreciation of the subtleties and breadth of Winnicott’s (and related) concepts will open links to Gestalt theory and practice especially in terms of “the use of self.” 10 hours
Instructor: Todd Senzon, MA, LP


Year III: Fall Semester

Object Relations, Self Psychology and Gestalt Therapy: an Integration: Gestalt therapy provides a comprehensive framework for object relations and self psychology psychoanalytic theories. We will review the different schools of object relations and self psychology theories, with an emphasis on how they can be utilized to broaden a Gestalt theoretical view of psychotherapy. Review of case material and use of experiential work in class will be used to enhance an understanding of object relations and self psychology from a Gestalt perspective. 10 hours
Instructor: Evan Senrich, LCSW

Case Seminar, Case Studies through the Life Cycle of Treatment: In this course, students read examples and then present their own cases surrounding the following topics: Beginnings: Introductions and Engagement; Middle Phase: Core Issues and Major Theme Development; Transference and Countertransference; and Endings: Termination Issues in Treatment.
10 hours
Instructors: Patricia Tucker, LCSW, LP and Connie Newman, MA, LMHC, LP

Group Psychotherapy Practice: The group experience brings out dimensions in a person’s character that frequently escape detection in individual treatment, specifically characterological issues and problems in personal relating. One half of each session will be an ongoing group, and the other half will be devoted to theory and to analysis of the actual group process.
25 hours
Instructors: Susan Friedberg, LCSW, LP; Neila Wyman, LCSW,LP; Arleen Maiorano, LCSW, LP


Year III: Spring Semester

Ethical Considerations in Analytic Practice: Intrinsic to ethical practice is the therapist’s respect both for the patient and for the complex and profound relationship, the “space between,” that is co-created by the patient/therapist meeting. We will discuss the philosophical, legal, and professional foundations that come together to form the core of current ethical practice.
15 hours
Instructor: Arleen Maiorano, LCSW, LP

Sociocultural Issues and the Therapeutic Relationship: This course explores the many ways that issues of “culture” influence the frame of psychotherapy and the relationship between client and therapist. A historical and psychoanalytic context is provided to help define “Multiculturalism, Biculturalism and Interculturalism. Next, an analysis is provided by several Gestalt therapists. Emphasis is given to therapist and client field-related issues with regard to race and ethnicity. Finally, the course looks at social action as it relates to Gestalt therapy theory and to our role as Gestalt therapists. 10 hours
Instructor: Patricia Tucker, LCSW, LP

Case Seminar in Dreamwork: In this course, we will focus on the clinical use of dreams, noticing their structure and timing in the therapeutic process, and how they arise from and impact the therapy and the treatment relationship. We will use case examples to demonstrate how images from dreams and dreamwork can be utilized as an ongoing homework practice to help patients alter habitual patterns of interrupting contact. Each participant will contribute case examples for discussion, and will prepare a paper and presentation. 10 hours
Instructor: Susan Jurkowski, LCSW


Year IV: Fall Semester

Understanding and Working With Personality Disorders: This seminar will focus on the difficult treatment issues presented by Personality Disorders. The seminar will include: an overview of the different theories and ways of looking at Personality Disorders; their characteristics and diagnosis; and different principles of intervention, with an accent on the Gestalt approach to treatment. Participants are invited to present cases from their practice in this seminar.
10 hours
Instructor: Jim Mulry, LCSW, LP

Case Seminar, Presentness and Presence: Gestalt therapy has always emphasized the experience of the present moment. This focus has served to heighten our awareness of the immediacy of living our lives, and of contact with what is. Presence is the basis for all forms of presentness. This seminar will include didactic and experiential explorations of both presentness and presence, and will address clinical applications and implications of this expansion of the Gestalt approach. 10 hours
Instructor: Alan Cohen, LCSW, LP

Research II, The Case Study in Context: Through class discussion of course reading assignments and project preparation students will achieve a comprehensive understanding of the contextual field in which the case study prevails as the research model utilized by psychotherapists across a range of theoretical approaches. 15 hours
Instructor: Todd Senzon, LP


Year IV: Spring Semester

Resistance, Transference, Countertransference III, Existential Issues: This course will examine transference/countertransference/resistance in its historical context as it emerged from an intrapsychic individualist model and developed into a model focusing on the emerging structure of the situation. We will analyze the influence of phenomenology, gestalt psychology, and existentialism, as they relate to the innovations of Gestalt therapy. Clinical material will be presented to exemplify contemporary Gestalt therapy’s use of transference/counter-transference as a functioning of the contact-boundary in a psychotherapeutic meeting.
10 hours
Instructor: Daniel Bloom, JD, LCSW

Family and Couples Therapy From a Systems, Gestalt and Psychoanalytic Perspective: This course will address family issues, dynamics and treatment from a Gestalt Psychoanalytic perspective, interweaving ideas derived from Family Systems theory. We will look at the history of the development of Family Therapy, various schools of thought, emphasizing gestalt, psychoanalytic and systems thinking and modes of treatment. We will study tapes and use role play as well as supervision of actual cases to explore various treatment interventions based on solid theoretical formulations. 15 hours
Instructor: Susan Friedberg, LCSW, LP

Case Seminar, The Person-in-Relation: This seminar will examine the individual cases of participants, focusing on the patient’s relationships. We will look at the patient’s early development and explore its impact of on the dynamics of the patient’s adult relationships. We will look at the patient’s attempts to repair early fragmentations or to “close” unfinished gestalts, focusing on their choice of relationships and patterns of interacting within their relationships. Each seminar participant will present a written case summary, exploring the specific dynamics of one or more primary relationships. 10 hours
Instructor: Arleen Maiorano, LCSW, LP

 


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